Information and Resources from the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center

Blogging Through It: 8 Reasons to Blog - con't.

3. Set the tone.

There are lots of reasons to write a blog, regardless of whether you have writing aspirations. But if you are interested in writing, take a look at this site on what makes for a good blog.
A lot of people don't know how to talk about cancer. A blog gives you the chance to set the tone of your conversation about cancer and let people know where you're coming from. It can help them understand that you are still you: You have scary times and funny times. You find insight into life one day, but the next day life just sucks. By sharing your experience, it may help to shoo the elephant out of the room next time your friends call to say hi.

4. Get rid of your guilt.

It can be difficult to say no, but you have to when you're managing life with a cancer diagnosis. For Mabry, it's still difficult to accept she can't do things like bring a crockpot full of food to a friend whose father is in the hospital.

"I can post about how paralyzing it can feel to be in this situation and maybe people will get that," she said. "People can forgive me for things that they may not otherwise understand because they don't have the backstory."

5. Get a virtual pat on the back.

Sometimes you can use a boost. Blogs offer readers the opportunity to post comments in response to your posts. Bailey said she's received about 500 messages since she launched her CarePage in March. Sometimes they're messages of encouragement, but other times, they're just good laughs.

6. Document your experience.

This is a life-altering moment for you. It could be something you wish to document, particularly if you have young children who may want to learn more about it when they're older. If you're not sure you're ready to share your experience with other people, make your blog completely private and treat it as an online journal.

7. No experience necessary.

Mabry never felt confident in her writing. As a certified art therapist, she always considered herself a more visual person. But CarePages has changed that.

"It's interesting to write on my CarePage and not really care what my writing is like from a grammar perspective," she said. "I talk about what life is about and I don't really care about the grammar. It's funny, though; I get a lot of feedback that I'm an eloquent writer."

8. It's free.

Who doesn't like free stuff? Several services provide free blogging. WordPress and Blogger are among the most popular. Just be sure to check your privacy settings to be sure you're not sharing more than you want to. Chacon-Lontin uses a pseudonym and is careful not to post anything that would allow strangers to identify himself or his family. CarePages, offered through the Cancer Center, is designed specifically for patients and families. For more information about this service, stop by the Patient & Family Lounge, on Level 1, or the Patient Education Resource Center, on Level B-1, or call 734-615-5216. You can also use this phone number to learn more about the Cancer Center's Creative Writing Program.

Keep Reading

Our Blogging Picks

return to the top of the page


Speak with a Cancer nurse: 1-800-865-1125
For more information about CarePages, stop by the Patient & Family Lounge, on Level 1, or the Patient Education Resource Center, on Level B-1, or call 734-615-5216. You can also use this phone number to learn more about the Cancer Center's Creative Writing Program.

Small Text SizeMedium Text SizeLarge Text Size
Adjust text size

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center
1500 East Medical Center Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

© 2013 Regents of the University of Michigan / Developed & maintained by: Public Relations & Marketing Communications. Contact Us or UMHS. The information presented is not a tool for self diagnosis or a substitute for professional care.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]