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Please note: This article is part of the Cancer Center's News Archive and is here for historical purposes. The information and links may no longer be up-to-date.

Michigan Oncology Journal Spring 2000

Of Interest

New Faculty
Asra Ahmed, M.D.
Lecturer/Research Fellow
Division of Hematology/Oncology

Previously completed a residency in Internal Medicine at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor and a Hematology/Oncology Fellowship at the University of Michigan
Expertise: general hematology
Professional Interests: coagulation disorders

 

 

 

Kenneth Cooke, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Pediatrics
Previously served as an Instructor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Expertise: pediatric bone marrow transplant
Professional Interests: novel therapeutics for lung disease after bone marrow transplant

 

 

 

Richard W. Lieberman, M.D., F.A.C.O.G., F.C.A.P.
Clinical Assistant Professor,
Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynecology

Previously completed a fellowship in Breast and Gynecologic Pathology at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, D.C.
Expertise: management of lower genital tract pre-invasive neoplasia
Professional Interests: use of computers for clinical information retrieval and education

 

 

Anthony W. Opipari, M.D., Ph.D.
Lecturer, Obstetrics and Gynecology
Previously completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at University of Michigan
Expertise: management of lower genital tract pre-invasive neoplasia
Professional Interests: development of new treatment strategies based on studies of cell death and immune regulation

 

 

 


Lisa G. Payne-Rojkjaer, M.D.
Lecturer/Research Fellow
Division of Hematology/Oncology

Previously completed a Human Genetics Research Fellowship at the University of Michigan
Expertise: general hematology
Professional Interests: fibrinolysis and tumor growth

 

 

 


Theodora R. Ross, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Division of Hematology/Oncology

Previously served as an Instructor in Medicine and Oncology at Harvard University, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Expertise: cancer biology
Professional Interests: leukemia and breast cancer

 

 

 

 

Mark M. Zalupski, M.D.
Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Hematology/Oncology
Previously served on the faculty of Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit
Expertise: gastrointestinal cancer, sarcoma
Professional Interests: experimental therapeu tics, clinical research.

 

Clinical Services
New Educational Tools
A Cancer Genetics Educational Book and accompanying CD-ROM (in Spanish or English) developed at the University of Michigan are now available. The book and CD-ROM are aimed at conveying basic genetic concepts and the relationship between genes and cancer by utilizing high-quality graphics and text material. These patient education tools may significantly benefit patients undergoing counseling and risk assessment sessions with health care providers. Accordingly, the instruments are reusable, durable and self-paced for use in genetics education prior to discussions of informed consent or risk assessment. These tools are to be used with adults over the age of 18 and are not suitable for children or for mentally challenged adults. For more information, contact Cancer AnswerLine™ 800-865-1125.

Announcements
Highlights from ASCO 2000
The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center in conjunction with the Michigan Society of Hematology and Oncology present "Interpreting Clinical Data: Highlights from ASCO 2000" at the Towsley Center at the University of Michigan Medical Center on Saturday, June 10, from 8:00 a.m. through 3:00 p.m. As in past years, this course will feature speakers who will present and analyze the most recent data from the May 2000 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. For more information, contact Cancer AnswerLine™ 800-865-1125.

Clinical Trials
Two studies are being conducted with the help of an award from the U-M Faculty Group Practice in both the Melanoma and BMT programs to determine if earlier identification of patient distress is possible and/or useful. The basic design of the melanoma and BMT studies is essentially identical. Upon arrival at the clinic and prior to any intervention, patients complete a series of questionnaires on emotional distress, quality of life, coping strategies and anxiety designed to provide baseline levels of distress at initial contact with the U-M Cancer Center. Those who go on to receive treatment at the U-M are asked to participate in a second phase in which distress is again evaluated following the medical intervention and participants are divided by distress level into low, medium and high distress groups. Within each group individuals are randomly assigned to either standard medical care or standard medical care plus a psychological intervention. Following the intervention, individuals are again assessed, and receive subsequent assessment at 6- and 12-month follow-up to determine if distress has returned. In this way, it is hoped that early predictors of distress and efficacious methods for its reduction may be identified so that they may be easily incorporated into clinical practice.

Study using the Gamma Probe-guided Sentinel Node Localization technique for patients with early (T1 and T2) cancer of the oral cavity. The tremendous success with this technique seen in breast cancer and melanoma will be applied to oral cavity cancer. Eligible patients include those with early, untreated oral cavity cancer and clinically negative necks. Preoperatively, Technetium Tc 99 Sulfur Colloid is injected perilesionally and the labeled or sentinel node is localized intraoperatively and removed prior to selective neck dissection. Ultimately, the goal of the study is to establish the Sentinel Node Technique as an accurate staging method that can replace a staging neck dissection in this group of patients.

Research effort to evaluate the role of selective neck dissections in a large cohort of head and neck cancer patients with limited neck disease. Our goal is to perform less radical surgery while maintaining clinical effectiveness and preserving better shoulder function and quality of life. Eligible patients include those with untreated neck metastasis <3 cm from primary sites in the oral cavity, oropharynx, and (T1) supraglottic larynx. By using the selective neck dissection, as opposed to the more extensive modified radical dissection, we expect comparably low recurrence rates in the neck and less shoulder dysfunction. Prospective, longitudinal quality of life and shoulder function assessments will be performed.

The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is participating in the second breast cancer prevention trial sponsored by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP). This study, known as STAR (Study of Tamoxifen And Raloxifene), is being conducted throughout the United States and Canada. Participants will be randomized to receive either tamoxifen (Nolvadex) or raloxifene (Evista). Eligible patients include post-menopausal women with LCIS, atypical hyperplasia, a family history or other significant risk factors. Patients are ineligible if they have a history of previous intraductal or invasive carcinoma of the breast, DVT, PE, CVA, or TIA. Current coumadin, cholestyramine, estrogen or progesterone use is prohibited.

 

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Please note: The articles listed in the Cancer Center's News Archive are here for historical purposes. The information and links may no longer be up-to-date.